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How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

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If you’ve ever tasted pesto in Italy you know that the pesto here in the United States just isn’t the same. I received a lesson in how to make pesto from a real Italian grandmother last week and now I understand the difference and what makes it so.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

My friend Francesca makes the trip from her small town near the pesto-epicenter of Genoa, Italy to San Francisco once or twice a year – this time (lucky for us) she brought her mom and two-year old son Mattia. Her mom makes a beautiful pesto (and perfectly light, potato gnocchi to go along with it) and offered to show me and my friend Jen how it is done. I have to say, it was a complete game-changer. If you love pesto, you really have to try this. Her technique results in an incredibly special pesto.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

Chop by hand or blender?

Most of the pesto you encounter here in the U.S. is different for a few reasons. First off, most of what you see is made by machine, usually a food processor or hand blender. This holds true even if it is homemade. Don’t get me wrong, it usually tastes good, but because the ingredients aren’t hand chopped you end up with an texture that is more like like a moist paste and there little to no definition between ingredients.

During my lesson I quickly began to realize chopping all the ingredients by hand and not blending them is key because this prevents the ingredients from becoming a completely homogenized emulsion or paste. When you dress a pasta with a pesto that has been hand chopped the minuscule flecks of basil will separate from the olive oil in places, you get definition between ingredients, and bright flavors pop in a way they don’t when they’ve been blended into one.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

Choosing the right basil

Another thing, Genovese pesto is famous in part because it is often made with young, small basil leaves. For us non-Italians it is easy to find Genovese basil in stores and at farmer’s markets particularly in the summer, but chances are it wasn’t picked young. I wouldn’t worry about it too much, simply by hand chopping all your ingredients, you will see a major shift in personality of your pesto. If you grow your own basil, I’m envious.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

If you’re serious about making good pesto, using this technique, get a good, sharp (preferably large, single blade) mezzaluna, or a good knife – you’ll need it. Chopping the ingredients will take twenty minutes or so. Whatever you use to chop, make sure it has a sharp blade or the basil will turn dark. Once you chop your ingredients, you’ll form them into a cake, pictured above. You add olive oil to this cake, and it’s magic – below. 

How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

How to Store Pesto

Store any pesto you might use in the next day or two, refrigerated, under a thin film of olive oil. You can also freeze it in snack-sized baggies. Thaw and toss whatever gnocchi or pasta you like with it.

Let me know if you try this and what you think! Use your beautiful fresh pesto with this gnocchi recipe. Tutto bene!

Continue reading How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother on 101 Cookbooks

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kbrint
4 hours ago
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Looks legit.
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Detecting Kernel Memory Disclosure – Whitepaper

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Posted by Mateusz Jurczyk, Project Zero

Since early 2017, we have been working on Bochspwn Reloaded – a piece of dynamic binary instrumentation built on top of the Bochs IA-32 software emulator, designed to identify memory disclosure vulnerabilities in operating system kernels. Over the course of the project, we successfully used it to discover and report over 70 previously unknown security issues in Windows, and more than 10 bugs in Linux. We discussed the general design of the tool at REcon Montreal and Black Hat USA in June and July last year, and followed up with the description of the latest implemented features and their results at INFILTRATE in April 2018 (click on the links for slides).

As we learned during this study, the problem of leaking uninitialized kernel memory to user space is not caused merely by simple programming errors. Instead, it is deeply rooted in the nature of the C programming language, and has been around since the very early days of privilege separation in operating systems. In an attempt to systematically outline the background of the bug class and the current state of the art, we wrote a comprehensive paper on this subject. It aims to provide an exhaustive guide to kernel infoleaks, their genesis, related prior work, means of detection and future avenues of research. While a significant portion of the document is dedicated to Bochspwn Reloaded, it also covers other methods of infoleak detection, non-memory data sinks and alternative applications of full-system instrumentation, including the evaluation of some of the ideas based on the developed prototypes and experiments performed as part of this work.

Without further ado, enjoy the read:

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kbrint
2 days ago
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Whoa.
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miracle fly

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Musca_domestica_a_scifi_horror_movie
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kbrint
6 days ago
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1 public comment
tante
11 days ago
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The miracle of flies
Oldenburg/Germany

1834: The First Cyberattack

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Tom Standage has a great story of the first cyberattack against a telegraph network.

The Blanc brothers traded government bonds at the exchange in the city of Bordeaux, where information about market movements took several days to arrive from Paris by mail coach. Accordingly, traders who could get the information more quickly could make money by anticipating these movements. Some tried using messengers and carrier pigeons, but the Blanc brothers found a way to use the telegraph line instead. They bribed the telegraph operator in the city of Tours to introduce deliberate errors into routine government messages being sent over the network.

The telegraph's encoding system included a "backspace" symbol that instructed the transcriber to ignore the previous character. The addition of a spurious character indicating the direction of the previous day's market movement, followed by a backspace, meant the text of the message being sent was unaffected when it was written out for delivery at the end of the line. But this extra character could be seen by another accomplice: a former telegraph operator who observed the telegraph tower outside Bordeaux with a telescope, and then passed on the news to the Blancs. The scam was only uncovered in 1836, when the crooked operator in Tours fell ill and revealed all to a friend, who he hoped would take his place. The Blanc brothers were put on trial, though they could not be convicted because there was no law against misuse of data networks. But the Blancs' pioneering misuse of the French network qualifies as the world's first cyber-attack.

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kbrint
6 days ago
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Numbers Stations

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On numbers stations.

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kbrint
9 days ago
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Kidnapping Fraud

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Fake kidnapping fraud:

"Most commonly we have unsolicited calls to potential victims in Australia, purporting to represent the people in authority in China and suggesting to intending victims here they have been involved in some sort of offence in China or elsewhere, for which they're being held responsible," Commander McLean said.

The scammers threaten the students with deportation from Australia or some kind of criminal punishment.

The victims are then coerced into providing their identification details or money to get out of the supposed trouble they're in.

Commander McLean said there are also cases where the student is told they have to hide in a hotel room, provide compromising photos of themselves and cut off all contact.

This simulates a kidnapping.

"So having tricked the victims in Australia into providing the photographs, and money and documents and other things, they then present the information back to the unknowing families in China to suggest that their children who are abroad are in trouble," Commander McLean said.

"So quite circular in a sense...very skilled, very cunning."

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kbrint
9 days ago
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Wow.
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