142 stories
·
2 followers

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Wise Master

1 Comment and 8 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
The wise master is, in fact, the only happy person in the world.

New comic!
Today's News:

One week to BAHFest Houston! Get your tickets now or dwell on remorse for all time!

Read the whole story
kbrint
5 days ago
reply
False. There are not infinite points. #PlanckDistance
Share this story
Delete

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - BAH

1 Comment and 3 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Impractical? They said the Wright Brothers were impractical!

New comic!
Today's News:
Read the whole story
kbrint
5 days ago
reply
Make America Bleed Again.
Share this story
Delete

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Self-Assessment

2 Comments and 5 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
My rational mind doesn't want to do it. My emotional mind doesn't want to do it. So, who in there is controlling my behavior?

New comic!
Today's News:

Two weeks left to get your tickets for BAHFest Houston!

Read the whole story
kbrint
5 days ago
reply
Social Networking, people.
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
francisga
14 days ago
reply
"I don't want more. I want other people to have less."
Lafayette, LA, USA

Two-ingredient Candied Citrus Pops

1 Share

Get ready. These are my new favorite thing, and I suspect they might end up being your favorite thing too. Imagine plump, juicy, citrus segments coated in thin, crunchy, sugar shells. You bite through the crust, and the citrus explodes with a wave of sweetness. It's a concept I wish I'd thought of myself, but it's actually a recipe by Dirt Candy's Amanda Cohen, featured in Cherry Bombe: The Cookbook. Amanda was inspired by a street food vendor in Beijing. And, it's funny, there is a beautiful photo of her grapefruit pops in the book, but it was her description of the street vendor, and the way his slices lit up the entire street that charmed me into trying them.

Candied Citrus Pops

A couple things to note before making these. It's helpful to have a block of foam from a package, or the kind of foam you might use to arrange flowers. This helps your pops stay upright after you candy them. The other consideration is how hot to let the sugar get. Amanda recommends going to 275 - 300°F - or until the mixture is light brown. I like the pops that go a bit darker than that, you get a lot of caramel and molasses notes that play of the citrus in magical ways. The blood orange segments I did in the darkest sugar mixture were a complete revelation. But this is all personal preference, so experiment to figure out where you'd like to be on the spectrum. One last thing I'll mention, if your mixture doesn't get hot enough, the candy shell won't set.

Candied Citrus Pops

I found the easiest citrus to deal with was anything easy to peel, with minimal seeds, and small to medium in size. Some of the grapefruits were tricky to peel and keep intact. Kishu mandarins, on the other hand, are a dream to work with (pictured). Play around - this is peak citrus season and this make for a dramatic snack, treat, or dessert!

Continue reading Two-ingredient Candied Citrus Pops...
Read the whole story
kbrint
6 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Keyboard In Acetone

jwz
1 Comment and 2 Shares
Read the whole story
kbrint
10 days ago
reply
Neat.
Share this story
Delete

Gitignore patterns

1 Share

Emacs left behind an auto-save file, c/#computer-wizardry.blog#, and every time I did git status -s I saw it mentioned. So I wanted to tell Git to ignore this sort of file. (Sure, I could just remove the file, but that's not the point.)

Git has a mechanism for telling it that certain files are uninterresting and should never be tracked. You put patterns into .git/info/exclude, and files whose names match the patterns are ignored. I wanted to exclude all files whose names begin and and with a # sign, so I put in:

    #.*#

but this didn't work. I did cat .git/info/exclude and the line wasn't there. “Wat” I said, and went to edit the file, and there it was. I then realized that the default .git/info/exclude starts with a big comment explaining how it works, that the comment lines all start with #, that my new line also starts with #, so it is a comment, so Git was ignoring it, and also I was ignoring it when I did cat to view the file, and that's why I thought it wasn't there at all. Sheesh.

So I escaped the # signs:

    \#.*\#

and that also didn't work. Then I got out the manual and found that you only need to escape a # sign at the start of a line, so I changed it to:

    \#.*#

and it still didn't work. At that point I gave up and moved on to doing something else.

Today I came back to it. I thought that a straight-up filename was matched by any file with that name in any subdirectory, but maybe I had that wrong, so I tried

    */#.*#

which ought to work at least for files one level down, but it didn't. Then I consulted the manual again and found that ** will match any sequence of directories, so I tried

    **/#.*#

and that didn't work either. Then I tinkered with backslashing the # signs various ways but nothing fixed the problem.

The problem was that I was using regex syntax .* instead of glob syntax *. The right answer is:

    \#*#

Just to be clear, this was not a problem with Git. It was a problem with me. Some days it pays to just stay in bed.

Sheesh.

Read the whole story
kbrint
13 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories